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Old 17th October 2010, 21:14   #41
geoff_boycotts_grandmother
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huda View Post
Tell you what, Ponty and Julian Fountain are taking alot of the credit, whether rightly or wrongly is another matter. The NZ batting is/was pretty shocking, apart from Mcculum and Taylor there is nothing there now even in ODI cricket. They could suffer badly in their upcoming tour of India.
Awaits FS' comments.

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Yep and what a bit of confidence does to a team and the lack of it to the other. The NZ batsmen played some silly shots and played like they were going to get whitewashed. They didn't take the powerplay when Elliot and Vettori were in with something like 80 needed off 23 overs, instead Mills had to take with 1 wicket left.
Not entirely surprised by this result. NZ have a very poor team, with their batting in particular wafer thin, but credit to the Bangles for beating what's in front of them.
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Old 17th October 2010, 23:40   #42
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Originally Posted by geoff_boycotts_grandmother View Post
Awaits FS' comments.
The Bangla express pace bowling has certainly taken it up a notch since Pont arrived.

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Not entirely surprised by this result. NZ have a very poor team, with their batting in particular wafer thin, but credit to the Bangles for beating what's in front of them.
True enough but this supposedly feeble side has generally punched well above its apparent weight.
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Old 18th October 2010, 09:33   #43
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True enough but this supposedly feeble side has generally punched well above its apparent weight.
Yes, indeed the Kiwis have been renowned for being generally a high quality ODI side. But recent results and a glance at their teamsheet in terms of likely quality output and this particular side is not cut from the same cloth. It is still a very good achievement for Bangladesh to knock them over in effecting a whitewash (it is exactly that in my book as I tend to think a washout is a void), but this Kiwi side is a bit desparate looking.

Having said all that, they may beat India in the odd game sparking much gnashing of teeth, with hopefully a few more ODI seris being cancelled there.

http://www.cricinfo.com/bangladesh-v...ry/482305.html

Here is an article discussing that Bangladesh's improvement.
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Last edited by Chin Music : 18th October 2010 at 09:45. Reason: add article
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Old 19th October 2010, 00:19   #44
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Originally Posted by Chin Music View Post
Yes, indeed the Kiwis have been renowned for being generally a high quality ODI side. But recent results and a glance at their teamsheet in terms of likely quality output and this particular side is not cut from the same cloth. It is still a very good achievement for Bangladesh to knock them over in effecting a whitewash (it is exactly that in my book as I tend to think a washout is a void), but this Kiwi side is a bit desparate looking.

Having said all that, they may beat India in the odd game sparking much gnashing of teeth, with hopefully a few more ODI seris being cancelled there.

http://www.cricinfo.com/bangladesh-v...ry/482305.html

Here is an article discussing that Bangladesh's improvement.
A lot of their retired test players were still playing ODIs until recently. Their current ODI team looks like their test team and that's not a good thing considering how bad their test team is.
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Old 19th October 2010, 03:19   #45
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As much as it is a chore for England to have played Bangla so often in the past year, I believe much of the Banglas improvement can be attributed to gains made through playing us. We may have beaten them rather convincingly, yet their batting was competitive, mostly.
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Old 19th October 2010, 03:48   #46
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Bang have been improving steadily for a while now. I do remember Tamim getting a 150 against India and one has to remember that Bang. did defeat England at Bristol. If not for Morgan's heroics Bang. would have won at Dhaka too.
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Old 19th October 2010, 07:16   #47
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Bang have been improving steadily for a while now. I do remember Tamim getting a 150 against India and one has to remember that Bang. did defeat England at Bristol. If not for Morgan's heroics Bang. would have won at Dhaka too.
You could say that about a players performance in a winning cause in most one day matches.
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Old 15th December 2010, 15:50   #48
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Hope noone minds but thought was interesting from our old friend;

Dhaka Rallies

Within weeks of SPIN columnist Ian Pont becoming Bangladesh bowling coach, the side won its first major series after 24 years’ trying. He tells us why world cricket’s minnows may finally be close to a major breakthrough


E
verything happened very quickly. On the Sunday, I was asked to become bowling coach of Bangladesh – and four days later, I landed in Dhaka to start my new job. I’d been in contact with the Bangladesh board before about running some fast bowling camps and they’d been quite keen to do something with me. Lance Klusener had been down to do the job with the national team but when he decided he didn’t want to come, I chatted with the board and it quickly became clear that we were both keen.
My own coaching business is still up and running: I’ve got lots of people I coach regularly in the UK but I suddenly had to leave the country very quickly! As well as Klusener, Andy Caddick and Graham Dilley had been mentioned as candidates. I’d thrown my hat into the ring for the England job earlier this year but David Saker was chosen. There’s only nine Test teams and now I have one of only nine Test bowlers coach jobs. Once you are on that merry-go-round, it must make it a lot easier when other jobs come up. It’s perfect for me, coming in in the run-up to the World Cup.
I’d never been to Bangladesh before. The country looks pretty chaotic when you first arrive, certainly in terms of travel, but everyone is massively friendly. They love cricket with a passion and fall over themselves to try and help you. Apart from anything else, though, this job is a challenge from a coaching viewpoint for me: does my stuff actually hold water at this level?

I arrived 14 days before the start of the series with New Zealand. I asked Jamie Siddons, the head coach, where they were up to and he said they hadn’t had a dedicated bowling coach for most of the year. Basically, he said, in one-day internationals they needed to stop going for seven an over with the new ball and to learn to start bowling at the death. If you look at their results, they’d leaked a lot of runs at the beginning and the end. The spinners are very good: they’ve got three left-arm spinners who tie the middle overs down. But powerplays and the end of the innings had been the problem. But against New Zealand, we focused on hitting the top of off-stump and bowling yorkers and slower balls at the end – and they were absolutely sensational. They just did what we had trained.
In losing 4-0 to Bangladesh, New Zealand, on reflection were… under-par. Distinctly ordinary. They admitted that themselves. Their batting was woeful. Every game we played we had them four or five wickets down for not many – which is a credit to our bowlers. The New Zealanders were decimated when they went home by their press. They were slaughtered. It was Bangladesh’s first series win over major opposition in 24 years’ trying.
The other big thing that changed for us was that Julien Fountain, the former ECB and West Indies fielding coach, arrived with the team three weeks before me. In fact, I spoke to Julien before I came and he said, “It’s a good gig, come and do it – there’s no prima donnas in the changing room, they’re all good young kids who want to learn.”
The work Julien has done on the fielding has been remarkable: they’re saving 25-30 runs in the field by diving like goalkeepers which previously they didn’t do. Add to that the fact that they bowled straight and mixed it up... and of course they have Shakib al Hasan who’s a serious batsman.
We didn’t even have Tamim Iqbal in the New Zealand series. He is coming back from a wrist injury in time for the five-match Zimbabwe ODI series [which runs to December 12]. As England saw earlier this year, Tamim’s an unbelievable player, who just destroys bowling attacks. He just stands there and tees off – but more than that he’s a very good technician.
It’s an interesting squad: the young kids’ knowledge level is more basic than I’d thought. What they’ve been exposed to in terms of coaching is not what we would expect in England or Australia or South Africa. When I talk to them about swinging the ball or reverse swing it’s almost new information for them. They’re keen to learn. But they play a lot of club cricket, so maybe some players haven’t had consistent access to the top coaches as much as we would expect, 
I don’t know.
It’s been a whirlwind couple of months, anyway. We’re decimal points away from West Indies in eighth spot in the ICC ODI rankings now. When I first met up with Jamie Siddons, he said it would be good to win the series so the players get confidence but that it would be particularly good to win some narrow games – and three of the wins against New Zealand were by nine, nine and three runs. So we/they are learning to win close games. I think it was almost the perfect series win. Not just because they completed the Tigerwash as it’s being called (by me), but the fact that in three of the four, the fast bowlers were bowling the last over to win the game when historically the fast bowlers haven’t really delivered the goods.
So I think there’s been a watershed and there’s a new belief: maybe in home conditions they can beat most of the teams that come here. Afterwards, it was all a bit like when England won the Ashes. We all went to see the prime minister and had a dinner with her and we got all sorts of gifts: we were all given 200,000 taka, which is about two grand; the players all go a car; and next week we’re all getting a motorbike each. It’s madness! Laptops, money, suits!
The Zimbabwe series will be interesting. They seem to be getting their act together. But Bangladesh should have too much for them: I’ll be disappointed if we don’t beat them quite comfortably on home turf. I’ve got six weeks at home at Christmas, and then the World Cup, starting in February – we’re playing India in the tournament opener in Dhaka. And bear in mind Bangladesh dumped India out of the last World Cup. I was at the 2007 World Cup with Holland but this will be a new experience for me, being there with a full ODI-playing country.

Because of the background to cricket here, when we do a training camp, there’s a lot more actual coaching going on – and a lot more running too. It’s more intensive and more physical: I can’t believe England or Australia would train in the same way. I’m not sure the England bowlers would be allowed to! We got all nine of Bangladesh’s bowlers doing two days of walk-through drills. I’d never be able to do that with Anderson, Broad and Finn. But I’m doing it with these boys and they’re enjoying it and learning something.
It’s a different job to the England job, I imagine. The requirements are different – here, even the international players are still ‘development’ players. So my job isn’t just going through match videos with players. In terms of the specific fast bowlers I’m working with:
Mashrafe bin Mortaza, the captain, turned his ankle over in the first ODI and didn’t play for the rest of series. He bowls outswing, looks like Matthew Hoggard in terms of his action. He’s had about five or six knee operations and has dropped from 146 kph, when he first started, to 130 now.
Shafiul Islam bowls a bit like Makhaya Ntini – when I got here, he could only angle it in and bowl in-swing. Now he bowls outswing too – as Brendon McCullum discovered. Shafiul had started work on it before I was here but I worked on his wrist position and we’ve developed that. He nicked McCullum off in the second game – McCullum had to play at it and he nicked it to the keeper. When the Deshis went to New Zealand in February he just kept angling it in and he got picked off. So the outswing was a surprise to everyone.
Rubel Hussain looks a bit like Malinga: he’s bowled 92-93 mph and I think he could go to 95 mph. He’s one of the guys I’m working on to access his hips and get his legs working – it’s all upper body at the moment. We’ve got him swinging it away where he used to just shape it in. He got man of the match in the last ODI – he knocked over the first three batters and then bowled Kyle Mills with a reverse swinging yorker to win the game.
Nazmul Hossain bowls some of the best slower balls I’ve ever seen: back of the hand, can’t pick it. In the first ODI he bowled three in a row at Mills and Mills swished and missed at all three. The difference is that these guys have got the confidence to do all this now.
Obviously I’m not surprised my methods work, though I’m slightly surprised at how the bowlers have improved so quickly. But there’s so much more to come with these guys. Knowledge-wise they’re not what you’d expect of an international bowler. I don’t mean that badly. They’re not tainted by hours and hours of coaching from someone with a badge: they’re natural bowlers who have found a way of bowling and I’m just trying to give them some guidelines to help them.
I know everyone said New Zealand were terrible, and they were underprepared, but I don’t think they were allowed to play well. My hope is that we carry on and take it into the World Cup. The West Indies, our third game, must be a target. And England in Chittagong on March 11 – that’s a massive chance, if England don’t come out 100 per cent. India in the first game – that’s a test for India. We’ve got South Africa here and Netherlands and Ireland. So it’s an interesting group. What would be success? Getting to the quarter finals would be big news. And then, if we were drawn in a home tie, you’d have to fancy us...
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Old 16th December 2010, 11:56   #49
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Nice read, and good luck to them
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Old 17th December 2010, 09:57   #50
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`**** reading that.
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Old 20th December 2010, 17:33   #51
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Greatbatch has become Chairmen of Selectors for New Zealand. John Wright comes in as coach.
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